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Experience design

Experience design is the practice of designing products, processes, services, events, and environments with a focus placed on the quality of the user experience and culturally relevant solutions. (source: Wikipedia)

The revolution will not be handheld

Moving beyond pushing pixels and designing under sea level with our iceberg.

“For those working in UX through the past several years, the shift from desktop to mobile has seemed a major event. No longer are our devices clearly situated. Instead they travel with us. Technology is now an appendage—always available in every moment of time, anywhere. (according to Holtzblatt & Beyer, 2017). The shift has forced changes to the way we design. We must cater for shallower engagement, support tasks across multiple devices, pare down UIs for smaller screens, and support touch-based manipulation.”

Gerry Gaffney a.k.a. /gerrygaffney | @gerrygaffney ~ Journal of Usability Studies 12.3

Patient Experience: A return to purpose

A growing experience design field, just like the design practices of Citizen Experience, Author Experience and Employee Experience.

“As an opening reflection to Volume 4 of Patient Experience Journal (PXJ), this editorial reviews the progress of the journal and the implications seen both in the evolving healthcare marketplace globally as well as reviews the data on the developing field of patient experience. It reinforces the need for an integrated view of experience as supported by data in the most recent State of Patient Experience research – one encompassing quality, safety, service, cost and population health implications and one driven on an engine of both patient and family engagement and employee/staff engagement. The article offers that healthcare is as dynamic as it has ever been and is now being pushed at speeds it has not been built to handle, suggesting the need for agility and vision, redesign and expanded thinking. The recognition of these intertwined realities reveals what the author suggests is a return to purpose in healthcare. This is framed by the reinforcement that engagement, communication, quality and safe outcomes are unquestionably central issues for healthcare and they are all now coming together as central to the overall experience dialogue. From these insights, the article offers an invitation for contributions to PXJ that will both underline and expand the exploration found on its pages, from types of submissions to topics including national and global perspectives, technology and culture. The author calls on readers to share their voice, stories, thoughts, research and experiences grounded in the essence of generosity that inspires each of us to sustain a commitment to positive experience efforts each day. The article leaves us in suggesting the powerful simplicity of a return to purpose may be one of the strongest foundations we could hope for in building the future of healthcare.”

Jason A. Wolf a.k.a. /jasonwolf | @jasonawolf ~ Patient Experience Journal 4.1

How IBM is embracing the future through design

Great posterchild of design in the enterprise.

“Shifting trends are forcing technology companies to reimagine their value proposition. IBM has chosen to create disruption through design. In embracing the future, the company is essentially invoking its past. Back in 1956, IBM was the first large company to establish a corporate-wide design program. But this time, the company’s goals are more ambitious.”

Atul Handa a.k.a. @at_hand /atulhanda and Kanupriya Vashisht a.k.a. @Kanu_Conceptell /kanuhanda ~ UXmatters

What’s the difference between an experience and a customer experience?

Broadening the scope of (marketing) definitions.

“So if you think your UX and CX are enough to surprise and delight your audience, you’re not quite right. It’s how you weave those features into the bigger story you’re trying to tell as a brand that really matters. That’s what experience is, and that’s what you should be striving for with your marketing this year.”

Ted Karczewski a.k.a. /tedhartkarczewski | @TeddyHK ~ ContentStandard

Inspiration for UX design from the Arts and Sciences

As long as the human experience is the focus of design, anything goes.

“Our experts have taken inspiration from such diverse fields as music, dance, philosophy, theater, and gastronomy. Have you taken inspiration from another profession and applied it in your UX design practice? If so, please share the source of your inspiration in the comments. Read on to learn about some of our experts’ sources of UX inspiration.”

(Janet Six ~ UXmatters)

The wicked craft of enterprise UX

“While everyone seems to have different definitions of craft, there are some common threads that suggest a special quality of diligence, pride, and beauty, borne out of shaping some raw material with the utmost personal care - whether it’s your hands covered with flour and sugar while making a pie, or some industrial-machined aluminum grafted with a high-resolution pixel display powered by smart algorithms… to keep your family comfortable while enjoying that delicious pie.”

(Uday Gajendar a.k.a. @udanium ~ Medium)

Merging service design with user experience design

Designing the flow and the journey as a coherent experience.

“There are as many ways of doing Service Design and User Experience Design as there are design companies working in these fields. This makes it somewhat complex and perhaps pointless to define these design fields. I understand that this blogpost will be a subject of discussion, and I’ll therefore begin by saying that the description that follows is based on my own, professional experiences as to the differences and similarities between Service Design and User Experience Design. (…) I’ll describe the differences and similarities between service design and user experience design and how they can work in symbiosis to generate exceptional services, products, business models and customer experiences.”

(Erik Westerdahl a.k.a. @erikwesterdahl ~ Screen Interaction)

What is object-oriented experience design?

So there must be a Gang of Four as well.

“The way we think about experience design and visual design is evolving. The digital environment is becoming increasingly more diverse, and experience design professionals need to adapt accordingly. Object-oriented design provides the toolset for user experience designers to face these challenges head-on.”

(Sharon Carter ~ Macquarium)

Advice from UX heroes: 9 golden nuggets

Always learn from the experienced experiences.

“A little over a year and a half ago, I was a UX intern with no idea what the heck was going on. I had a million questions about the field and desperately wanted answers and advice. I decided to start a podcast to pose these questions to some of my personal UX heroes. For the 18 months I’ve had the privilege of talking with some of the brightest minds in our field. I’ve bombarded them with questions from my perspective as a UX intern, and they’ve shared their wisdom with me. What follows are the pieces of advice that were most repeated on the show and that stood out most to me. I want to share them because they inspire me to become a better designer, and to be better rounded as a person.”

(Wesley Noble a.k.a. @wesley_noble ~ UXPA magazine)

Envisioning experience outcomes

Getting hold of the messy concept of experience.

“When your organization’s goal is to differentiate on the experience, you must start every product-development project by defining the experience that you want people to have with your product or service. Companies that differentiate on the experience do not begin by defining feature sets. They first define a vision for the experience outcome that they intend to deliver to their users and customers. Only once your team fully understands the experience outcomes that you want users to have can you make good decisions about what features and technologies would optimally support that vision.”

(Jim Nieters and Pabini Gabriel-Petit a.k.a. @pabini ~ UXmatters)

The future of UX research: Uncovering the true emotions of our users

Without facts based upon research you’ll end up with a lot of opinions.

“Truly understanding the feelings of our users has always been the dream of user experience researchers. Are they enjoying themselves? Are they frustrated? Are they genuinely interested and engaged? Understanding how a user truly feels in reaction to an experience can help us to optimize specific aspects of the experience to exude certain expressive states. We are entering a new age of insight that probes at the core of our users’ experience: studying their emotions.”

(Andrew Schall a.k.a. @andrewschall ~ User Experience 15.2)

Design principles: Insights are not about analytics

When you have no design principles, you’re not knowing where you’re going in the design space.

“Applying the Jobs-to-be-Done theory, rather than creating archetypal customer personas, we try to understand what motivates customers to use Intercom and what jobs they are addressing with the product. This practical implementation of Jobs-to-be-Done helps us to create what we call a Job Story.”

(Michelle Fitzpatrick a.k.a. @shelliefitz ~ Intercom)

How legend Paul Rand pioneered the era of design-led business

It’s called IBM version 5.

“In a way, what Apple does today with design is what IBM was doing in ‘50s (…) It was about simplification and cohesiveness across all platforms of the brand—products, ads, stores. These are all ideas in the modern vein that came about with Rand’s work with IBM. It set a precedent.”

(Carey Dunne a.k.a. @careydunne ~ FastCo Design)

The future of large UX design firms

Business and design, the other way around.

“The field of UX is growing and changing. More corporations than ever are now seeing the importance of user experience and bringing User Experience in house. Some companies are accelerating their adoption of User Experience by acquiring some of the best UX design consultancies. How will this shift affect large and medium-sized UX design firms in the near future?”

(Janet M. Six ~ UXmatters)

From empathy to advocacy

Changing perspectives can become lost in translation. It’s a competence, not an activity.

“The UX industry devotes considerable attention to the concept of empathy, and rightly so, as understanding our users and their needs is foundational to delivering quality experiences. Still, empathy and insights alone do not automatically create those experiences. What matters is how cultivating empathy alters our decisions and behaviors.”

(Lyle Mullican a.k.a. @mullican ~ A List Apart)

How to use an experience map to develop a winning content marketing strategy

Keep remembering, the map is not the territory.

“An experience map is a large visual of the path a consumer takes — from beginning to end — with your product. The goal of this map is to get everyone on your team on the same page about the customer journey — so it is to be shared. In addition, the map must be an easy-to-understand, self-contained unit.”

(Demian Farnworth a.k.a. @demianfarnworth ~ copyblogger) ~ courtesy of @thomasmarzano