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Customer experience

Customer experience is the sum of all experiences a customer has with a supplier of goods and/or services, over the duration of their relationship with that supplier. (source: Wikipedia)

At the crossroads of chaos and calamity

See how IBM is revitalizing Design in its organization.

“In a 1966 memo to all IBM employees, then-Chairman and CEO Thomas J. Watson, Jr. declared, Good design is good business. At that point in history, IBM used design to demystify technology when computing was new. Almost half a century later, IBM is using great design to create enterprise-class products that people love to use to get their work done. Scaling modern design across a portfolio of thousands of products that serve clients in more than 170 countries is much more than a two-pizza team challenge—and we like it that way.”

(Phil Gilbert a.k.a. @philgilbertsr ~ AIGA Gain conference 2014)

A new era for search: The zero moment-of-truth is now defined by shared customer experiences

Search and brand, the marketeers heaven. Find and experience, the designers heaven.

“Search is a natural step in the discovery process. In a web world, search engines offer a lens into a qualified and structured view to help online consumers focus and make informed decisions. With Google dominating search, marketers concentrated on improving search ranking through tried and true techniques to ensure that what they were marketing earned a coveted position in the likely search results a customer might consider clicking.”

(Brian Solis a.k.a. @briansolis)

Breaking up with the user in user experience strategy?

And all this because business has discovered experience as a significant and distinctive feature. Next, they’ll have to discover design.

“(…) many of the people attending CX conferences and subscribing to CX publications aren’t necessarily practitioners, but businesspeople whose organizations have, in some way, given them experience-related responsibilities and who must purchase consulting services to fulfill them. If we badge ourselves as strategists of any stripe in the field of experience, these are the people we need to be talking to.”

(Ronnie Battista ~ UXmatters)

Defining patient experience

Journal as a format. Online, public and to share.

“As patient experience continues to emerge as an area of research and practice in healthcare, the need for standard consistent definition becomes even more critical. Without a common foundation or at least a cornerstone on which to build or adapt, the efforts that follow are set on shaky ground. We offer these ideas not in the promotion of one idea over another, but in recognizing that in existing work and in the shared themes we uncovered there is a strong set of related concepts from which to grow. This will be critical to ensure patient experience remains a viable, respected, and highly embraced part of the healthcare conversation, as we believe it should.”

(Jason A. Wolf et al ~ Patient Experience Journal Volume 1Issue 1)

Bringing change to life

Design and designer as change agents, their best versions.

“Change in an organization is really hard. This is especially true when a company that was once on the forefront of innovation finds itself having lost that luster through its own growth and success. The last couple of years there has been a transformation happening at PayPal that is touching every part of the organization to make it innovative again. At the heart of this change is a new, close partnership between design and engineering. Can your organization be changed? From Bill’s experience at Yahoo!, Netflix, PayPal and consulting with numerous companies he believes there are some core principles you can employ to drive transformation that are all centered around the customer. The question Bill will explore is ‘How can design be the catalyst for that change?” While this talk will be inspirational, it will take an honest (and humorous) look at what has worked and what hasn’t worked so well in trying to scale change.”

(Bill Scott a.k.a. @billwscott ~ Adaptive Path‘s Managing Experience Conference 2014)

The customer experience obsession

Obsessed with customers, always good?

“Customer Experience is now accepted as a key driver for business growth, regardless of industry. This view is supported by research showing that customer experience leaders have significantly, consistently out-performed the S&P 500 in recent years — but understanding the value of customer experience and transcending engrained organizational processes that hinder it are different matters. Digital strategy has unleashed new, creative ways to engage customers throughout every step of their journey; it’s now time to consider the strategic role community plays in harnessing the value of digital interactions to inform long-term customer relationship and loyalty goals.”

(Wendy Lea a.k.a. @WendySLea ~ Adaptive Path‘s Managing Experience Conference 2014)

Telling stories: Mapping the patient experience at John Muir Health

PX (‘patient experience’) following close to CX (‘customer experience’). Upcoming new kid on the block soon, LX (‘learner experience’).

“For us this not only gave us an opportunity to leverage and diversify methods, like storytelling, to gather insights, but also brought us closer to the heart of the new face of healthcare, the patient.”

(Anel Muller ~ Adaptive Path)

The great convergence

Galaxies and Copernicus, doesn’t that ring a bell.

“So with three different starting points – UX from product development, service design from service delivery, and customer experience from marketing and customer support – we’ve all arrived at the same place: the realization that by consciously crafting the experiences people have with those products, services, or organizations, we can help those people be more successful and find more satisfaction. Oh yeah, and it’s good for business too.”

(Jesse James Garrett a.k.a. @jjg ~ Adaptive Path)

The shift: UX designers as business consultants

Will they then become CX consultants?

“UX is a broad field and designers are increasingly playing a strategic role in many companies. Be that designer. Businesses are increasingly adopting user-centered approaches to create experiences, moving UX design to be one of the core activities driving the company strategy and operations. This is an incredibly valuable opportunity that we designers can take to step up and contribute to create the great experiences and services they envision, taking our vision, tools and understanding to a different level. But we need to learn the new skills to play at this table, a table that’s often speaking a different language with a lot of politics and different stakeholders. This talk will cover exactly these extra skills that are required to make this strategic jump: understanding the business needs, educating the client, understanding the hidden request, managing the various party involved in a project, defining the right process, understanding the internal impact and more.”

(Davide Casali a.k.a. @Folletto ~ Interaction14 videos)

The beginning of a beautiful friendship: Data and design in innovative citizen experiences

This time, the C is Citizen and not Customer. Citizens are entitled to great CXs too.

“The past decade has brought enormous and growing benefits to ordinary citizens through applications built on public data. Any release of data offers advantages to experts, such as developers and journalists, but there is a crucial common factor in the most successful open data applications for non-experts: excellent design. In fact, open data and citizen-centered design are natural partners, especially as the government 2.0 movement turns to improving service delivery and government interaction in tandem with transparency. It’s nearly impossible to design innovative citizen experiences without data, but that data will not reach its full potential without careful choices about how to aggregate, present, and enable interaction with it.”

(Cyd Harrell a.k.a. @cydharrell ~ Beyond Transparency)

Connecting the customer experience

Unfortunately, no design or Design mentioned whatsoever.

“Enabling great customer experiences and optimizing them across all touchpoints in a consistent and human, customer-centric way leads to marketing success. And it increasingly revolves around personal, personalized and at the same time connected and integrated approaches.”

(J-P De Clerck a.k.a. @conversionation ~ i-Scoop)

Quantifying customer experience

Changing from UX design to CX design, just like that.

“Customer experience stretches far to either side of any interaction that can be influenced by UX interface design. Customer experience starts from when a customer first hears about what your product or service is promising, gets cemented by how well you deliver on that promise (through UI and well beyond), and gets broadcast in social media to influence the impressions of future customers. As such, it’s important to have a way to quantify the effects of the customer experience improvement that stretch beyond Google Analytics and screen attention heat mapping.”

(CX design 2013)

Building the in-house design agency: Getting the best of both worlds

Embedding UX capabilities in the enterprise is a major challenge for the field.

“The biggest barrier I’ve seen to using UX in a firm is often simple lack of knowledge of what UX can deliver. (…) An integrated internal UX team is critical to organizational success, and the stakes are higher in larger enterprises. An internal practice that builds lasting relationships, provides thought leadership, and acts as trusted advisors provides long-lasting value to the firm. As the digital space becomes increasingly human-centric, and organizations evolve offerings around consumer need, the internal user experience agency plays a significant part in delivering both short term wins as well as long term success.”

(Stephen Turbek a.k.a. @Stephenturbek ~ Boxes and Arrows)

Service principles guide customer experience

Principles in general and design principles in particular are great beacons.

“When people in an organisation have different interpretations of what really matters to customers, the customer experience falls apart. The difficulty is to align business units and individuals to do the right things – and do them consistently. Strong principles are a powerful way to unite teams to deliver better customer experiences.”

(Anne Meijer and John Holager ~ live|work)

The intersection of user experience, customer experience and corporate strategy: The holy grail for 21st century business?

In the end, it all depends on the execution. Like always.

“UX and CX advocates and practitioners would do well to have a few beers together and explore how they can work to the common purpose of increasing customer uptake, loyalty, and advocacy across the entire ecosystem of their business’ interaction with their target market. And, senior executives need to lead that collaboration, if not mandate it. Their competitive position in the marketplace and future profitability may be at stake.”

(Chris Allen ~ HFI Connect)

Experience design is a perspective, not a discipline

Dynamic DTDT at the edges of our field.

“Our intention is to help business and design collaborate more intelligently. Unlocking the power of design allows a business to anticipate, plan for, and deliver experiences that are more likely to engage a customer in value-based relationships – ones that can be differentiated in ways that are both meaningful and measurable.”

(Patrick Newbery ~ UX Magazine)

Mapping business value to UX

The economic transaction of design is not its core.

“(…) we’ll expand on our approach to mapping business value to User Experience and explain how we have put it to use. Our goal in sharing this information is to be as transparent as possible about our process and our intentions, so the greater UX community can pursue an important conversation that we’ve been eager to have. What is that conversation going to be about? It is a dialogue that centers around selling User Experience – which goes far beyond user-interface design – to all of our organizations. This is a dialogue in which we, as an industry, need to engage. Hopefully, hearing our story will inspire you to share your own story.”

(Lis Hubert a.k.a. @lishubert and Paul McAleer a.k.a. @paulmcaleer ~ UXmatters)