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Accessibility

Accessibility is the degree to which a product, device, service, or environment is available to as many people as possible. (source: Wikipedia)

Web Accessibility: A Broader View

“In this paper, we take a broader view, discussing an approach that costs developers less and provides greater advantages to a larger community of users. While we have quite specific aims in our technical work, we hope it can also serve as an example of how the technical conversation regarding Web accessibility can move beyond the narrow confines of limited adaptations for small populations.” (John T. Richards and Vicki L. Hanson – IBM Accessibility Center) – courtesy of joeclark

Web Accessibility and Design: A Failure of the Imagination

“Web Accessibility and Web Design are two disciplines with a common theory and divergent practices. Both endeavors rely on a standard set of techniques to ensure a consistent experience of data and content across a diverse set of end users. Both rely on creative individuals to build and deliver great sites and great experiences that have an impact on the user. Both seek to extend the reach of the end user and link individuals together to form a stronger collective whole. However, despite the common theory that links them, web accessibility and web design do not share a common set of practices. Sites hailed for their accessibility are rarely noted for their design. Sites hailed for their design are rarely noteworthy as models of accessibility. Few sites are ever held up as models of both great accessibility and great design.” (Bob Regan – Designing for the 21st Century III) – courtesy of usability news

Debunking Web Accessibility Myths

“The Disability Discrimination Act says that websites must be made accessible to disabled people. The DRC’s recent report has suddenly thrown this into the spotlight of the online community and a lot of misinformation has been thrown around. In this article, I shall attempt to put a stop to this misinformation and tell you the truth behind Web accessibility.” (Usability News)

10 Accessibility Blunders of the Big Players

“Web accessibility is about making your Website accessible to all Internet users (both disabled and non-disabled), regardless of what browsing technology they’re using. More and more countries have passed laws stating that Websites must be accessible to blind and disabled people. With this kind of legal pressure, and the many benefits of accessibility, the big players on the Web must surely have accessible Websites, right?” (Trenton Moss – sitepoint) – courtesy of deswozhere

Dive Into Accessibility

“This book answers two questions. The first question is ‘Why should I make my web site more accessible?’ If you do not have a web site, this book is not for you. The second question is ‘How can I make my web site more accessible?’ If you are not convinced by the first answer, you will not be interested in the second.” (Mark Pilgrim) – courtesy of guuui

2004 Presidential homepage shootout targets speed and accessibility

“As candidates turn to web sites to help pump up support, the difference between winning and losing in a tight race could come down to satisfying donors and voters online. Fast page displays and easy accessibility are two measurable prerequisites to user satisfaction. To see how well the candidates fare online, we analyzed the ten presidential homepages for speed and accessibility, and compared these results to existing guidelines. So how did the candidate sites measure up? In a word, poorly.” (Optimization Week Magazine) – courtesy of andy king

Attitudes to Web Accessibility

“During the summer of 2003, we ran an online questionnaire, conducted interviews and carried out a literature review on Web accessibility. One hundred and seventeen respondents participated and they included designers, information officers and accessibility advocates. This initial set of results are intended to encourage debate on the subject.” (John Knight – Usability News)