Author Archives: Peter Bogaards

Connectedland #2020

When all design disciplines are converging, why are there then so many design specialties.

“​Design disciplines are converging, as smart and autonomous product ecosystems increasingly blend human, digital and physical service experiences. (…) It’s time to revisit those considerations as design disciplines are converging, and that’s a great thing.”

Fabio Sergio a.k.a. /fabiosergio | @freegorifero

Content: The design system element you forgot

Content, the orphan of design as always. We used to call it information, that helped.

“​Content and design are parallel, intertwined communication systems. They are fundamentally dependent on each other for successful outcomes. (…) Content and design can integrate right down to having repeatable variants and data references within design tokens. It’s entirely possible to integrate that deeply, and scale up content rapidly. So I don’t buy the arguments put forward so far that content doesn’t scale, or that it should be an afterthought.”

Kate Kenyon a.k.a. /katekenyon

Data-driven design: Gathering data for your design project

Getting quantitative insights into your design decisions.

“​This is not the millionth article that will tell you to base your UX decisions on an obscure combination of metrics. Data-driven can be taken quite literally: using real data in the design process from start to finish. This is an overview of where we are now and what lies ahead.”

Peter Vermaercke a.k.a. /petervermaercke | @pvermaer

First things first: Exploring Maslow’s hierarchy as a service prioritization framework

Like Kahneman, Cialdini, you can use Maslow for anything.

“​This paper proposes a model for categorizing library services and resources by their importance to users based on the service’s fundamentality to the other resources and services in the library’s offerings, the degree to which the service affects users, and the scope of users that access the service. Adapted from Abraham Maslow’s theory of motivation, we substitute individual human motivations for a community’s motivations for using the library. Maslow’s five tiers – physiological needs, safety needs, love and belongingness needs, esteem needs, and self-actualization – are changed to library-specific tiers: Library as Minimum Viable Product, Library as Convenience, Library as Connector, Library as Incubator, and Community as Library. The Hierarchy of Library User Needs is a theoretical tool for service prioritization with the potential to facilitate discussions between users and libraries. Libraries may wish to (re)evaluate the alignment between the resources they devote to their services and the items that are most likely to be used and appreciated by their users.”

Judith Logan & Kyla Everall ~ Weave: Journal of Library User Experience 2.2

The service design maturity model: An introduction

Growth is not the same as maturity. Progression versus regression.

“​In this blog, we will be sharing a strategic framework that we created to help organisations embed service design at scale; the Service Design Maturity Model. We will shortly elaborate on the different maturity stages. The next blogs which will follow soon, will be deep-dives on each of the maturity stages and will provide some thoughts on our biggest learnings using the framework.”

Niels Corsten a.k.a. /nielscorsten | @NielsCorsten ~ Koos Service Design

Five scales to measure customer satisfaction

Fitting qualities into numbers is like fitting squares into circles.

“​Somewhat confusingly, satisfaction scales also have a subgroup called satisfaction scales. I’ve broken this group into three further subgroups (unipolar rating scales, unipolar thermometers, and bipolar rating scales) as some research suggests that they have different reliability and discriminating characteristics. That gives us five common ways you’ll see satisfaction measured, with some notes about how particular scales have performed in published research.”

Jeff Sauro a.k.a. /jeffsauro | @MeasuringU ~ MeasuringU

Diving into global Information Design: Cosmology in the large

There might be something in universal InfoDesign as well.

“​Classification is an intellectual act, performed as often in the name of theology as in the name of science. The classifications proposed here are an attempt to impose useful differences onto a field of infinite examples. In that sense, it is analogous to classification schemes in the biological sciences. In his explanation of contemporary evolution theory, David Quammen describes how the biologists Robert Whittaker and Lynn Margulis recognized the limits of imposing order on the phenomenon we study.”

Paul Kahn a.k.a. /paulkahn | @pauldavidkahn ~ Nightingale

Content-first for a better user experience

The content experience as a result of content design.

“​This is a people problem. We have all the tools we need. Too many, in fact. Go back to pencil and paper. Sticky notes and whiteboards. Don’t wait for the perfect time or the perfect project. They won’t happen. Figure out what you can do tomorrow – or today – to start the shift to a content-first process. Don’t wait to be asked. No one is going to ask you to do this. Make it happen. When you do, everyone is happy.”

Carrie Hane a.k.a. /carriehane | @carriehd ~ Tanzen

Color psychology

Color, it only exists because of humans. No color without the eye.

“​Learn how to build color palettes that command user attention, speed-up task completion, and evoke the right emotions. Our color psychology guide covers color theory, the psychology of color and practical applications for interactive design and UXD.”

Brian Cugelman, Rena Cugelman & Friends ~ Alter Spark

Defining the future of human information consumption

Consumption, as in human infovores.

“​Human evolution depends on an ever-increasing rate of information creation and consumption. From communication to entertainment to education, the more information we create and consume, the stronger our society in total. Communication enhances community. Entertainment encourages creativity. Education builds knowledge. All of these elements build on top of one another like an upside-down pyramid, each new layer built a little bigger on top of the prior. It’s no coincidence that the Information Age of the last several decades has marked both the greatest period of increased information creation and consumption as well as, arguably, the greatest period of human progress.”

Doug Clinton a.k.a. /douglasclinton | @dougclinton ~ Loup Ventures

The power of critique: How to improve feedback on your team

Design critique, properly done the best feedback loop.

“​Giving each other helpful feedback is one of the most important parts of being a team. But many teams struggle to give each other feedback in productive ways. Thankfully, the design community has been absolutely obsessed with how to give each other feedback since the start of time.”

Braden Kowitz a.k.a. /kowitz | @kowitz ~ Range

The digital revolution will see you now: Transforming patient experience in the digital era

Digital infiltrating in every aspect of live, and changing it.

“​Industry after industry has reinvented itself in response to upstart challengers and shifting consumer expectations that are the hallmarks of this new era. The same is true in healthcare, where we have weathered the introduction of the electronic medical records, patient portals and now interoperability. But to date our industry’s digital transformation has been guided largely by government regulation – leaving the design of the future of healthcare to be driven by policy makers and executed largely by IT departments. Meanwhile, most other industries have turned to a different guru for inspiration and guidance: the consumer. Northwell Health has undertaken a cultural transformation grounded in patient and family centered care. In this narrative, we explore our digital patient experience (dPx) journey and lessons learned. Every person, every role, every moment matters.”

Emily Kagan Trenchard, Laura Semlies, and Sven Gierlinger ~ PXJ Issue 2

Three people-centered design principles for deep learning

Taking the human perspective in all technology achievements.

“​Our people-centered design principles support the goal of providing and informing with data to allow people more opportunities in their work. In our experience, there are three key principles organizations need to hold up as pillars for any AI implementation: transparency, explainability, and reversibility. (…) There are three methods that companies can take to put these principles into action in their AI projects. These methods aim to reduce the risk of introducing poorly tuned AI systems and inaccurate or biased decision-making in pilots and implementations.”

David A. Bray et al. ~ MIT Sloan Management Review

A new model for the design thinking process

Design thinking process in many variations.

“​One way to frame the relationship between these two is that design properties describe the foundational structures on which design principles are hung. Or to use an analogy, properties are the basic rules of chess (how the board is set up, how the pieces move, etc.), and principles are the various strategies, play styles, and schools of thought.”

Yosef Shuman a.k.a. /yosefshuman | @aleafinwater ~ YosefsHuman.com courtesy of @peterboersma

Global Information Design: A New Framework for Understanding Data Visualization

Now wondering how the underlying data sets are represented.

“​Information designers and dataviz practitioners today face a daily challenge: what technique, method, software, or code library to use for their next project. Practitioners look both forward and backward, trying to keep up with the latest software tools and at the same time find more examples from the past — “classic” examples that can teach us something today.”

Paul Kahn a.k.a. /paulkahn | @pauldavidkahn ~ Medium

A Design Thinking Mindset for Data Science

Thinking from a human perspective for data scientists.

“Data science has received recent attention in the technical research and business strategy since; however, there is an opportunity for increased research and improvements on the data science research process itself. Through the research methods described in this paper, we believe there is potential for the application of design thinking to the data science process in an effort to formalize and improve the research project process. Thus, this paper will focus on three core areas of such theory. The first is a background of the data science research process and an identification of the common pitfalls data scientists face. The second is an explanation of how design thinking principles can be applied to data science. The third is a proposed new process for data science research projects based on the aforementioned findings. The paper will conclude with an analysis of implications for both data science individuals and teams and suggestions for future research to validate the proposed framework.”

Rachel Woods ~ Towards Data Science

Making the case for service design for start-ups and innovation

All manifestations of design are relevant for start-ups, scale-ups and f*ck-ups.

“Start-ups and innovation environments represent exciting, challenging and relatively-uncharted terrain for service design. Despite the fact that we as service designers are barely visible in the start-up world, and mostly unmentioned in their literature, my own experience as a service designer working with start-ups and innovation programmes has proven to me that we can add significant value in these settings. In this article, I’ll look at hurdles to address and overcome in terms of mindset, and suggest some practical ways service designers can address this opportunity.”

Jesse Grimes a.k.a. /jessegrimes ~ Kolmiot Service Design