Author Archives: Peter Bogaards

Reflection on business, design and value

Fits into the trend of Value Sensitive Design and more.

“​What’s been important about the emergence of design thinking aside from the capacities it creates is that it points to the activities of design as a source of value, instead of focusing solely on the products of design. To me this is an important distinction and increases the relevance of design to business exponentially. It also means that design activities, when made visible as a source of value, have the potential to be learned and used across the entire organization.”

Andrea Mignolo a.k.a. /mignolo | @pnts courtesy of @odannyboy

A day in the life of a UX manager

Sounds like an old Beatles song.

“​Informed by interviews with ten UX managers, this article presents a hypothetical day-in-the-life of a first-level, non-executive UX manager. This article is meant for senior ICs who wish to learn more about UX management. (…) The UX manager’s role is to enable their team and the people on it to be successful. This purpose drives many diverse activities, from the tactical to the strategic and from the empowering to the directed. Senior ICs who wish to try UX management can start by looking beyond their deliverables and begin to help their peers, team, and products grow.”

Jerrod Larson a.k.a. /jerrod-larson ~ UXPA Magazine

Human-to-Human Interaction Style in Voice User Interface Design

Talk to me and experience how much ambiguity there is in spoken language.

“​Advancements in natural language processing, voice recognition technology, and speech synthesis allow voice-enabled devices to mimic human-to-human interactions fairly well. The levels of capabilities that devices and machines have to simulate human voices and generate natural(-like) language in a conversation vary across platforms, and since it is a relatively new technological innovation, users often do not have consistent expectations of their conversation with a conversational user interface (CUI). These inconsistent expectations are often exacerbated by the differences between verbal and written language when the CUI modality is voice; this is a subset of conversational UIs called voice user interfaces.”

Esther Horowitz a.k.a. /esther-horowitz | @estherhorowitz5 ~ UXPA Magazine

The Magic That Makes Customer Experiences Stick

Magic? It’s just thoughtful design.

“​Today’s customer journey is not just a matter of a few touch points as the consumer systematically narrows choices. Instead, most consumers take an iterative and expansive journey. They consider multiple perspectives, often through the use of social media. They interact with other people and other products and services. The journey between visiting a company’s website, say, and making an actual purchase is an emotional, cognitive, and motivational process. It’s the mix of those forces that creates feelings, memories, and stories about an organization, whether positive, negative, or ambivalent. It’s this variability that creates opportunities for companies to deliver memorable experiences. (…)”

Stefan Thomke a.k.a. /stefan-thomke-innovation ~ MIT Sloan Management Review courtesy of @2BFrank

User experience as legitimacy trap

Designers are responsible, always and everywhere.

“​For many years, telling someone in everyday settings that you worked on user interface design or human-computer interaction would produce puzzled looks and require a good deal more explanation. With the rise of design and interaction associated with the proliferation of interactive devices, these terms became much more familiar to people outside the discipline. Lately, though, there has been a second shift. Lately, if you tell someone that you work on interactive systems, or that you find new ways to make interaction effective and enjoyable, it is likely to evoke a skeptical or mistrustful response. In light of a series of scandals – over user data management, over online profiling, over online tracking, over targeted manipulation, over digital addiction, and more – user experience professionals and researchers have found themselves facing new questions about our work and its consequences.”

Paul Dourish a.k.a. /pauldourish ~ ACM Interactions XXVI.6

Patient perspectives: Four pillars of professionalism

Professionalism as core value of the Health sector.

“​Professionalism is a core component of healthcare practice and education; however, there is often not a consistent description of professionalism, and current definitions lack a key perspective: that of the patient. This study aimed to deepen understandings of patients’ perspectives on how professionalism should be enacted by healthcare providers. Using a phenomenological approach informed by constructivist theory, the study team conducted semi-structured interviews and focus groups with 21 patients to ascertain their views on professionalism. Data analysis was conducted using a constant comparative approach wherein initial analysis informed subsequent data collection. Participant themes fell into four pillars of professionalism: taking a collaborative human-first approach; communicating with heart and mind; behaving with integrity; and practicing competently. This study highlights patient perspectives on professionalism and examines consistencies and differences between those perspectives and those of healthcare providers, which are extensively described in the literature. While published literature highlights competence and communication as main aspects of professionalism which our participants also focused on, participants in this study emphasized integrating patients into care teams, employing empathy, and demonstrating integrity.”

Laura Yvonne Bulk et al. ~ Patient Experience Journal 6.3

Design thinking isn’t user experience

Bounderies of labels can be fuzzy if you don’t know what you’re talking about.

“​Design thinking is everywhere, but definitions and interpretations vary. Is it a paradigm allowing you to “think like a designer?” A platform for creating innovation? A mindset you must shift into to design products? A process focused on bringing sketched ideas to life? Many believe it is the process that customer experience (CX) and user experience (UX) practitioners use to do their work, and by harnessing their approach, anybody can do CX or UX work. If nothing else, it’s a cottage industry offering endless training, workshops and certifications.”

Debbie Levitt a.k.a. /debbielevitt | @PtypeUX

The eight pillars of user research

Noticing a lot of overlaps and omissions regarding all things user, field and design research.

“​These eight pillars are the broad areas of User Research. Underneath these pillars sit groups of things that User Researchers or ‘people who do research’ (PWDR) are concerned with. Many of these things are challenges to operationalising research.”

Emma Boulton a.k.a. /emmalouiseboulton | @emmaboulton

Connectedland #2020

When all design disciplines are converging, why are there then so many design specialties.

“​Design disciplines are converging, as smart and autonomous product ecosystems increasingly blend human, digital and physical service experiences. (…) It’s time to revisit those considerations as design disciplines are converging, and that’s a great thing.”

Fabio Sergio a.k.a. /fabiosergio | @freegorifero

Content: The design system element you forgot

Content, the orphan of design as always. We used to call it information, that helped.

“​Content and design are parallel, intertwined communication systems. They are fundamentally dependent on each other for successful outcomes. (…) Content and design can integrate right down to having repeatable variants and data references within design tokens. It’s entirely possible to integrate that deeply, and scale up content rapidly. So I don’t buy the arguments put forward so far that content doesn’t scale, or that it should be an afterthought.”

Kate Kenyon a.k.a. /katekenyon

Data-driven design: Gathering data for your design project

Getting quantitative insights into your design decisions.

“​This is not the millionth article that will tell you to base your UX decisions on an obscure combination of metrics. Data-driven can be taken quite literally: using real data in the design process from start to finish. This is an overview of where we are now and what lies ahead.”

Peter Vermaercke a.k.a. /petervermaercke | @pvermaer

First things first: Exploring Maslow’s hierarchy as a service prioritization framework

Like Kahneman, Cialdini, you can use Maslow for anything.

“​This paper proposes a model for categorizing library services and resources by their importance to users based on the service’s fundamentality to the other resources and services in the library’s offerings, the degree to which the service affects users, and the scope of users that access the service. Adapted from Abraham Maslow’s theory of motivation, we substitute individual human motivations for a community’s motivations for using the library. Maslow’s five tiers – physiological needs, safety needs, love and belongingness needs, esteem needs, and self-actualization – are changed to library-specific tiers: Library as Minimum Viable Product, Library as Convenience, Library as Connector, Library as Incubator, and Community as Library. The Hierarchy of Library User Needs is a theoretical tool for service prioritization with the potential to facilitate discussions between users and libraries. Libraries may wish to (re)evaluate the alignment between the resources they devote to their services and the items that are most likely to be used and appreciated by their users.”

Judith Logan & Kyla Everall ~ Weave: Journal of Library User Experience 2.2

The service design maturity model: An introduction

Growth is not the same as maturity. Progression versus regression.

“​In this blog, we will be sharing a strategic framework that we created to help organisations embed service design at scale; the Service Design Maturity Model. We will shortly elaborate on the different maturity stages. The next blogs which will follow soon, will be deep-dives on each of the maturity stages and will provide some thoughts on our biggest learnings using the framework.”

Niels Corsten a.k.a. /nielscorsten | @NielsCorsten ~ Koos Service Design

Five scales to measure customer satisfaction

Fitting qualities into numbers is like fitting squares into circles.

“​Somewhat confusingly, satisfaction scales also have a subgroup called satisfaction scales. I’ve broken this group into three further subgroups (unipolar rating scales, unipolar thermometers, and bipolar rating scales) as some research suggests that they have different reliability and discriminating characteristics. That gives us five common ways you’ll see satisfaction measured, with some notes about how particular scales have performed in published research.”

Jeff Sauro a.k.a. /jeffsauro | @MeasuringU ~ MeasuringU

Diving into global Information Design: Cosmology in the large

There might be something in universal InfoDesign as well.

“​Classification is an intellectual act, performed as often in the name of theology as in the name of science. The classifications proposed here are an attempt to impose useful differences onto a field of infinite examples. In that sense, it is analogous to classification schemes in the biological sciences. In his explanation of contemporary evolution theory, David Quammen describes how the biologists Robert Whittaker and Lynn Margulis recognized the limits of imposing order on the phenomenon we study.”

Paul Kahn a.k.a. /paulkahn | @pauldavidkahn ~ Nightingale

Content-first for a better user experience

The content experience as a result of content design.

“​This is a people problem. We have all the tools we need. Too many, in fact. Go back to pencil and paper. Sticky notes and whiteboards. Don’t wait for the perfect time or the perfect project. They won’t happen. Figure out what you can do tomorrow – or today – to start the shift to a content-first process. Don’t wait to be asked. No one is going to ask you to do this. Make it happen. When you do, everyone is happy.”

Carrie Hane a.k.a. /carriehane | @carriehd ~ Tanzen

Color psychology

Color, it only exists because of humans. No color without the eye.

“​Learn how to build color palettes that command user attention, speed-up task completion, and evoke the right emotions. Our color psychology guide covers color theory, the psychology of color and practical applications for interactive design and UXD.”

Brian Cugelman, Rena Cugelman & Friends ~ Alter Spark

Defining the future of human information consumption

Consumption, as in human infovores.

“​Human evolution depends on an ever-increasing rate of information creation and consumption. From communication to entertainment to education, the more information we create and consume, the stronger our society in total. Communication enhances community. Entertainment encourages creativity. Education builds knowledge. All of these elements build on top of one another like an upside-down pyramid, each new layer built a little bigger on top of the prior. It’s no coincidence that the Information Age of the last several decades has marked both the greatest period of increased information creation and consumption as well as, arguably, the greatest period of human progress.”

Doug Clinton a.k.a. /douglasclinton | @dougclinton ~ Loup Ventures