The future of UX research: Uncovering the true emotions of our users

Without facts based upon research you’ll end up with a lot of opinions.

“Truly understanding the feelings of our users has always been the dream of user experience researchers. Are they enjoying themselves? Are they frustrated? Are they genuinely interested and engaged? Understanding how a user truly feels in reaction to an experience can help us to optimize specific aspects of the experience to exude certain expressive states. We are entering a new age of insight that probes at the core of our users’ experience: studying their emotions.”

(Andrew Schall a.k.a. @andrewschall ~ User Experience 15.2)

From the vault: Watching (and re-watching) The Mother of All Demos

On giants and shoulders.

“To give an idea of the scope of the demo, Engelbart demonstrated an early look at word processing, windowing, hypertext, and dynamic file linking, as well as using graphics in a computer program. It was also the first time many of the attendees had seen a mouse, although work on the mouse began in 1963.”

(Megan Geuss a.k.a. @MeganGeuss ~ Ars Technica)

UX in the era of Internet of Things

Any technology push gets the UX drift.

“The Internet of Things is accelerating rapidly, and bringing with it a wealth of opportunity. Though many focus on the data and technology needs of the Internet of Things – the sensors, data, and the storage, security, and analysis of that data – we’re already forgetting to think about the humans interacting with those technologies.”

(Ted McCarthy a.k.a. @thisrunson ~ ThoughtWorks)

What happens when search engines become intelligent?

Then they have to become smart.

“We’re talking on and on about making content more intelligent these days – format-agnostic, self-describing with semantic metadata, and modular – for reuse, for omnichannel, for delivering the right content to the right user, etc. But what about search engines themselves?”

(Noz Urbina a.k.a. @nozurbina ~ Urbina consulting)

When change is constant: A spiral UX design model

From left to right (process), top to bottom (organization). Now, it’s a circle for process and a network for organization.

“The representation of an actual UX design process with a design model probably presents an overly simplified view of the process. However, the design model serves a descriptive function. Additionally, having an abstract representation of the design process in the form of a design model highlights the essential forces driving the process of UX design: simultaneous changes in the problem and solution spaces. In this article, I’ve proposed a possible adaptation of the spiral model for a UX design process. By incorporating continuous changes to our understanding of the problem space into a systematic investigation of the solution space, we can synchronize these self-reinforcing forces and generate high-quality UX designs. However, several important aspects of the UX design process require further discussion of empirical evidence and feedback – for instance, adapting this model to agile software development.”

(Hang Guo ~ UXmatters)

Five misconceptions about UX in video games

In the end, all design fields will have to deal with human experiences.

“User Experience is becoming very trendy albeit fairly new in the video game industry, so there are still a lot of misconceptions regarding what it is (and what it’s not). I will try to tackle these misconceptions and convince you – if need be – that UX is indeed your friend.”

(Celia Hodent ~ Brains, UX and Games)

Content migration alone is not an effective content strategy

How strategic can a migration be?

“While fairly popular, ‘lift and shift’ is not a viable content strategy. It is a folly fueled by fear, limited resources, inexperience, and politics. There are better ways to ensure high-quality intranet content, and two award-winning designers offer their insights, proving that a bright attitude makes all the difference.”

(Kara Pernice ~ Nielsen Norman Group)

Why constraints are a fundamental part of design

Design is making decisions in the design space, determined by constraints.

“The word constraint can sound like a bad word. Constraints are something you can’t do. They restrict what you’re allowed to do They take away freedom. They remove options. They’re rules you didn’t set. They’re an early bedtime or being forced to eat your vegetables when you want ice cream.”

(Steven Bradley ~ vanseodesign)

How words are the foundation of interaction design

From words to stories, even in interactions.

“The words you choose, and how you put them together, will greatly influence your product’s overall message – and we’ll explain how using some words of our own. Below we’ll show you why words are the base of interaction design and how to know the context of the copy.”

(Jerry Cao a.k.a. @jerrycao_uxpin ~ Sitepoint)

Design’s role is to bridge context gaps: Andrew Hinton on making context understandable, smart devices, and programming literacy

Each time, IA is falling off the table when technology or design have the loudest mouth. But in the end, IA provides new meaning, truth, and value.

“Information architecture has always been a critical part of creating great products and services, and many would argue that, until now, it hasn’t been given the attention or respect it deserves. The need for thoughtful IA is increasing as we enter the multimodal world of IoT. Whether you call yourself an Information Architect or Designer, you need to care about context.”

(Mary Treseler a.k.a. @marytreseler ~ O’Reilly Radar)

From page to stage to screen: Designing an omni-channel experience

Every classification starts with the WhatIs dimension.

“(…) how can we, as UX professionals, design user experiences for different media or channels and achieve such success? We can achieve this by understanding the unique considerations for each channel and deciding what aspects of each channel we should take advantage of to enable us to create an optimal experience for each individual channel.”

(Traci Lepore a.k.a. @TraciUXD ~ UXmatters)

Positive design reference guide

From positive thinking and doing to happiness.

“The Positive Design Reference Guide focuses on the why, what and how of human experience – both in general, and in relation to design for well-being. The guide provides you with a quick entry point into the variety of theories that we believe can be relevant for well-being-driven design. It comprises 29 models, theories and frameworks, separated into two sections. The first section presents a collection of theories drawn from (positive) psychology, and the second section presents a collection of theories and frameworks drawn from (positive) design research.”

(Simon Jimenez, Anna Pohlmeyer & Pieter Desmet ~ Delft Institue of Positive Design)

Defining intelligent content

Intelligent content or smart content?

“Content that is both digital and data-driven is poised then to be highly dynamic. This means that the content can be adapted quickly and efficiently to exactly suit the needs of different users. It is fundamentally responsive, which is much more than simply adapting to different viewing dimensions. Intelligent content that is genuinely dynamic can be programmatically adapted to reflect specific product versions, to incorporate customer-specific details, and to take into account a user’s location and even background. It can be adapted to work optimally in different formats, themselves produced automatically.”

(The Content Philosopher)

The information professions: Knowledge, memory, heritage

After all the technology, we tend to forget the information. Info and Tech are brothers in arms.

“Along with leading to growth in the numbers of people doing information work, the increasing role of information in our contemporary society has led to an explosion of new information professions as well. The labels for these fields can be confusing and overlapping, and what does and does not constitute an information profession has become unclear. (…) The analysis makes possible the incorporation of popular new information disciplines into an overarching framework that includes pre-existing fields as well. The analysis provides a perspective that clarifies the relationships among the information disciplines as well as their relationship to other professional activities in society.”

(Marcia Bates ~ Information Research 20.1)

Intelligent content demystified: A practical, easy-to-understand explanation

I’m more into smart content. Smart as in CIA (CPU, Internet, and API).

“In very simple terms (…) intelligent content is an approach. Intelligent content is the approach of thinking through the way we structure (organize) and manage content – so that it can be managed as a strategic asset.”

(Robert Rose a.k.a. @Robert_Rose ~ Content Marketing Institute)

Why the Card UI is the next big interaction paradigm

There was a time when CUI meant ‘Character-based User Interface’. That time has gone.

“I think it’s safe to say that, going forward, the majority of mobile UI designs will be based on the card UI paradigm. The next logical step is marketing professionals and ad agencies starting to embrace cards. The larger platforms are already embracing it. The card UI is set to be the next creative canvas for online content and will consequently also be the next big ad unit.”

(Juntoo)

Design principles: Insights are not about analytics

When you have no design principles, you’re not knowing where you’re going in the design space.

“Applying the Jobs-to-be-Done theory, rather than creating archetypal customer personas, we try to understand what motivates customers to use Intercom and what jobs they are addressing with the product. This practical implementation of Jobs-to-be-Done helps us to create what we call a Job Story.”

(Michelle Fitzpatrick a.k.a. @shelliefitz ~ Intercom)